Species

Procambarus alleni
 

This crayfish is sometimes found in FL.

Orconectes Immunis

 Photo courtesy of Scott Francisco

Normally used as fishing bait in the brown form, The blue orconectes immunis are being introduced slowly in to the aquarium trade. The normal range of the orconectes immunis is the northern part of the united states. The blue ones are from New York state.


Cherax destructor

This large and hearty crayfish is from Australia.


This particular one is from Warren, NSW Australia.
"bluey"
Courtesy of Scott Clark.
These crayfish ,often called yabbies are great specimens to keep as a pet.

Cambarus Monongalensis

 photo courtesy of whitney stocker

Cambarus Monongalensis

Primarily a burrowing crayfish, found in The mountains of Pennsylvania, west Virginia, and Virginia. Unlike other blue crayfish, these are blue as a species, instead of a color morph. A true blue crayfish.

Cambarus Gentryi

This hearty crayfish is from central Tennessee, a primary burrower.

Orconectes Immunis

Photo courtesy of Scott Francisco



orconectes immunis

Normally used as fishing bait in the brown form, The blue orconectes immunis are being introduced slowly in to the aquarium trade. The normal range of the orconectes immunis is the northern part of the united states. The blue ones are from New York state.

Cherax Quadricarinatus

Pacifasticus Leniusculus

photo courtesy lee cain
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pacifasticus Leniusculus

This burly looking crayfish was found in the Columbia river in Oregon. Note the stout fore claws, no doubt a crayfish that spends it's life among heavy currents. This is a extremely rare specimen , as this is a blue morph of normally brown in color. and is the only one known alive.

Cherax Tenuimanus

Awesome looking specimen

Procambarus acutus

Otherwise known as the white river crayfish, the Procambarus acutus is widespread throughout the eastern united states. Locally here in New York state, they have been replacing the Orconectes immunis as the choice for bait farm crayfish. The one advantage is the females have the young in the fall, so when spring arrives, they are growing immediately instead of just hatching like the immunis. The acutus have better "bucket life" than the immunis, but they do have their downfalls too. They do cannibalize more frequently in heavy populations, and are a invasive type of crayfish, killing every immunis in a pond until the pond is completely taken over.

Cambarus Diogenes